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Musings of C. Clark Gayton, Jr.

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Soundtrack

Posted by C. Clark Gayton, Jr. on October 6, 2020

I was the music director for a new documentary “Hidden in Plain Sight – Revealing the Concealed Harpers Ferry Cemeteries.” Check out the soundtrack put together from my catalog.

If this moves you, here’s the trailer:

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News!

Posted by C. Clark Gayton, Jr. on August 18, 2020

Excited to share this news – produced the song “Red Pill” by Cat Dail that was just released in late July. So far, nice reviews and welcome ones!

From Indie Source:

“Producer and multi-winning Grammy winner, Clark Gayton (Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, Prince and so on) proves the theory that winners beget winners. Cat Dial is a creative force and “Red Pill” is a delicious swallow.”

From Music Mecca:

“The new single, “Red Pill,” boasts a star-studded supporting cast, and offers a hard rocking sonic delight with just enough indie pop to create a recollection of your favorite early 2000’s alt radio hits.”

Take a listen!

Take a look! Performing the song Flow Zone. Can’t believe this is from just last year in NYC!

 

What do you think?

 

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5 Months Ago

Posted by C. Clark Gayton, Jr. on July 22, 2020

I put together this Reggae Foundation mix on SoundCloud. Let me know what you think!

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April seems so long ago … RNZ Interview

Posted by C. Clark Gayton, Jr. on July 21, 2020

Enjoyed this interview on RNZ this past Spring.

 

 

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March 2020

Posted by C. Clark Gayton, Jr. on July 13, 2020

Benefit for Aaron Johnston – right before the world changed.

Aaron Johnston Kidney Transplant Benefit Show to Feature Joe Russo, Clark Gayton, Mauro Refosco and More

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2015 – Fatboy Kanootch!

Posted by C. Clark Gayton, Jr. on July 13, 2020

What a difference five years makes.

Fatboy Kanootch

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New York Blues Hall of Fame – Induction

Posted by C. Clark Gayton, Jr. on July 13, 2020

So glad to find this! I remember it well.

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The Grammys are to music as …

Posted by C. Clark Gayton, Jr. on February 17, 2012

It may be time to create an event that is dedicated to representing exceptional music in America. I guess it would be hard to determine who is going to decide what is good and what is not. Well, as far as I’m concerned, we all know deep down. It would just take some folks who want to have an event, and make the best choices.

The frauds will be peeking around the corner, wondering why they weren’t chosen. They’ll pretend not to care at first- why would they? There won’t be big endorsements, no big dance routines, no gift bag with a Cartier watch in it… why would we want this award? Will Justin be there?

An event about music would have everyone reeling right now. A modest, but significant award meant for artists, not entertainers.

Anyway- I think there’s something wrong with trying to seek acceptance from people who don’t like you. I say, just move on.

Fighting for your rights is so… 20th century.

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American Jazz History – Is the music racist?

Posted by C. Clark Gayton, Jr. on September 9, 2011

The word “jazz” has always been associated with exploitation. Just read the other day that they are taking the word “n#^*$%” out of Mark Twain novels now. What does that say? That there was no racism in the 19th century? The word “jazz” is drenched in racism, more than freedom to play what you “feel”. Early jazz had working hours, popular tunes that HAD to be played, and there were no “progressive” musicians with the attitude of not needing a gig, and insisting on playing their original music.The music happened despite restrictions imposed on it. Should we believe that Charlie Parker played standards because he loved the songs? He played them because the record companies wanted to generate publishing for their publishing companies, and made him play those songs. Bebop was a protest to this system. A code. Of course, the standards we all play are beautiful, but there are so many contradictions when it comes to music, so many foul characters of all races blurring the truth for personal gain. We can’t bury our heads in the sand when talking about the history of American music. The history is the reason it sounds as it does, not because we live in a vacuum, never letting social conditions or surroundings effect your expression, even if oppressed. The “can’t we all get along” view point is lazy and irresponsible, and can’t be trusted. IMHO, of course.

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And another thing … did I already talk about appreciation?

Posted by C. Clark Gayton, Jr. on August 25, 2011

It’s important to thank the people who have helped you, or given you good advice over the years. Most of the older musicians in this business have earned the knowledge that they have, it wasn’t given to them. In other words, what took them 20 hard years to learn, they GAVE to you in one or two sentences.

The other day, a trombone player that I turned on to a few gigs years back, talked to me like I was a rookie, I guess because he is doing very well now. He went on and on about how well he was doing, his new house, and how he just can’t take any more work… well… what do you say to that? He never called me for any of the jobs he couldn’t make! It was fine, because at the moment, I’m doing O.K., and I’m able to do what needs to be done. The problem here is, this screws up the musical eco system. You have to turn on the guys that helped you with work in order to keep the balance of music and employment in check. At present, the eco system is broken. There are not enough paying gigs in New York to sustain a living as a musician.

Where ever you make money is where you put it back. Invest in the community and people that put you on the map. The same goes for a band or club. If a certain band or musician gave an establishment credibility, that establishment should return the favor, and re-invest in those musicians, because they may be struggling now. Help THEM out!

The current wages New York clubs pay are the same wages they paid in the late ’60s and early ‘70s. Because of this, most “jazz’ musicians teach at clinics and universities. This is fine, but what’s happening now is that there’s nowhere to go after you graduate from these schools except back to school. Is this irony, or just sad?

Anyway, I’m ranting.

For the sake of the music, next time you see a musician that has helped you in any way, whether that musician called you to sub for them, gave a gig at the circus, or you just heard them play, thank them. Repay them if you can for their dedication to playing live music. Give them a call when they’re sick or having trouble. Believe it or not, this will help us all in the end.

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